Ukrainian lawmaker calls on Biden to respond to Russia’s killing of US journalist Brent Renaud

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Brent Renaud was filming a documentary about refugees when he was shot and killed by Russian forces at a checkpoint outside the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, on Sunday.

A Ukrainian member of parliament has condemned Russia’s killing of an American journalist on Sunday and called on President Joe Biden to respond, as tributes poured in from the international community.

Documentary journalist Brent Renaud, 50, was shot dead by Moscow troops on Sunday as he tried to film refugees fleeing the town of Irpin outside the Ukrainian capital. Two others were injured.

Kyiv lawmaker Inna Sovsun fired the US president‘s own words from February 15 in a bid to increase the pressure to act – warning that more American deaths could follow.

‘Recently, [Biden] said, “If [Russia] target Americans in [Ukraine] we will respond with force,” Sovsun wrote on Twitter.

‘Today, [Russian} troops killed American journalist Brent Renaud. I’m sure he is not [Russian President Vladimir Putin’s] first or last American victim. So what will be the answer? And above all, when?

Late Monday morning, Biden had not yet broken his silence on Renaud’s death.

GOP Rep. Michael Waltz of Florida told DailyMail.com that the journalist’s murder was “normal” for an autocrat like Putin. He also drew attention to American journalist Austin Tice, missing since his abduction in Syria in 2012.

“This is a tragedy and unfortunately quite normal for Vladimir Putin’s strategy to eradicate negative media coverage of his aggression. We have seen Putin’s regime repeatedly target journalists for their critical coverage of conflict zones. Russians, including Chechnya and Syria, and they have since stepped up censorship domestically with legislation to further censor the independent press,” Waltz said.

“As of 2012, American journalist Austin Tice remains missing after being abducted in Damascus and the US government has urged Russia to help facilitate his release.”

Ukrainian lawmaker Inna Sovsun has warned that Renaud will not be the

Ukrainian lawmaker Inna Sovsun has warned that Renaud will not be Putin’s ‘first or last American (sp) victim’

On Sunday, Biden’s national security adviser Jake Sullivan said the brutal killing was “shocking and horrific” and promised the United States would “enforce appropriate consequences.”

The top foreign policy pundit said he was only just made aware of the attack as he began an interview on CBS’s Face the Nation.

“I will consult with my colleagues, we will consult with the Ukrainians to determine how this happened and then measure and execute the appropriate consequences accordingly,” he said.

US Deputy Ambassador to the United Nations Richard Mills criticized Russia for the attack during the body’s session today.

“His death shows that Russia will do everything possible to silence stories that challenge its propaganda,” Mills said.

Meanwhile, the leaders of the UK, France and many other international elected officials condemned Russia and mourned Renaud’s execution.

Rustem Umerov, another Ukrainian MP, said: “Even terrorists never act this way”.

US Representative Adam Schiff, head of the House Intelligence Committee, lashed out at Putin’s “brutality” but did not call on the United States to retaliate.

“There is no democracy without a free press. Brent Renaud’s death at the hands of Russian forces underscores Putin’s indiscriminate brutality,’ Schiff wrote on Twitter on Sunday.

In mid-February, Biden vowed to

In mid-February, Biden vowed to ‘react forcefully’ if any American was targeted by Putin

“My prayers go out to Renaud’s family – and to the journalists in Ukraine and around the world who are risking everything to speak truth to power.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had spoken to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and said Renaud’s murder was a test for “all humanity”.

“Putin’s barbaric actions murdering Brent Renaud and other innocent civilians are testing not only Ukraine but all of humanity,” Johnson said.

‘Talking to the president [Zelensky] I assured him that we will continue to do everything possible to end this disastrous conflict.

French President Emmanuel Macron, who has spoken with Putin nine times by phone since meeting the autocrat in the Kremlin on February 7, mourned all the journalists killed in the line of duty.

“Today an American journalist was killed in Ukraine. Before him, others have been targeted, murdered, injured or kidnapped. Our thoughts go out to all these journalists driven by courage and an ideal: the freedom to inform. This freedom is fundamental to our democracies,” Macron said.

Canadian MP Melanie Joly said the news was “devastating”.

“In a war fueled by disinformation, the role of journalists is more essential than ever. My thoughts are with his family and loved ones,’ Joly tweeted.

Indian lawmaker Vijayasai Reddy said, “Opening fire on a foreign press vehicle is highly condemnable and the war must end.”

Nigerian politician Shehu Sani has urged journalists covering Russia’s brutal war against Ukraine to be cautious.

“The murder of American journalist Brent Renaud in Ukraine is tragic and unfortunate. He died in the line of duty doing what he loves most. Journalists working in Ukraine should be careful,” he said.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had spoken to Ukrainian President Zelensky and condemned Putin's actions in Ukraine as being

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had spoken to Ukrainian President Zelensky and condemned Putin’s actions in Ukraine as “barbaric”.

<a class=French President Emmanuel Macron, whose office said he spoke to Putin nine times by phone since they met in person in early February, also weighed in.” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

French President Emmanuel Macron, whose office said he spoke to Putin nine times by phone since they met in person in early February, also weighed in.

Another Ukrainian MP said the actions of the Russians were worse than those of the

Another Ukrainian MP says Russian actions were worse than ‘terrorists’

Renaud was in a car with other journalists when Putin’s troops opened fire. He was fatally shot in the neck, and one of his colleagues was also injured.

A New York Times tribute article revealed that Renaud had survived a similar incident on a previous mission to Cambodia in the early 1990s, after walking through a military checkpoint with locals. This prompted the soldiers stationed there to open fire on him, although Renaud survived this incident unscathed.

Although Renaud was wearing a New York Times press badge at the time of his death, he was actually working as a freelancer on a global refugee film commissioned by the studio division of Time magazine.

Renaud’s death was announced by Andrey Nebitov, the head of the Kiev police department, who said he paid “with his life for trying to bring to light the ingenuity, cruelty and ruthlessness of the assailant”. .

Irpin Deputy Police Chief Captain Oleksandr Bogai said Renaud was shot in the head when Russian forces fired at his car. The vehicle was driven by a local civilian through a Ukrainian checkpoint.

Another American journalist who survived the attack spoke to a reporter for the Italian newspaper Internazionale from the hospital.

The other American journalist in the truck is Juan Arreondo.  He is shown in hospital talking to an Italian newspaper about how they were crossing a bridge when Russian troops opened fire on them past a checkpoint.

The other American journalist in the truck is Juan Arreondo. He is shown in hospital talking to an Italian newspaper about how they were crossing a bridge when Russian troops opened fire on them past a checkpoint.

Juan Arredondo said Renaud had been shot in the neck and “must be left behind”.

“We had crossed the first Irpin bridge. We were going to film other refugees as we left, we got into a car. Someone offered to take us to the other bridge. We went through a checkpoint and they started shooting at us. The driver turned around, there were two of us. My friend is Brent Renaud. He was shot and abandoned. I saw that he had been shot in the neck. We parted ways,” he said.

Renaud worked for Time Magazine’s television and film division on a series about refugees around the world called Tipping Point.

“Brent was in the area working on a Time Studios project focused on the global refugee crisis,” Time editor Edward Felsenthal and Time and Time Studios president Ian Orefice said in a statement. .

“Our hearts are with all of Brent’s loved ones. It is essential that journalists can safely cover this ongoing invasion and humanitarian crisis in Ukraine.’

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